The Drought’s Not Over! Continuing Water Conservation cover

The Drought’s Not Over! Continuing Water Conservation

By


It is important for Californians to continue to save water. Rainfall associated with El Niño is unlikely to end the drought.





NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

For a list of all authors on NoteStream, click here.




Read the NoteStream below, or download the app and read it on the go!

Save to App


The Drought’s Not Over! Continuing Water Conservation

Long Recovery

While recent rainstorms will help put a dent in California’s water deficit brought on by the drought, it will take six or seven years of above-average rainfall to refill groundwater basins and reservoirs and recover from the current drought, according to NASA.

In the meantime, it is important for Californians to continue the successful water conservation measures that have achieved record-setting water savings in recent years. By removing lawns and replacing them with drought-tolerant landscaping, harvesting rainwater, and using less water for day-to-day activities, Californians can adapt to ongoing water scarcity in the state.

Shut It Off

Shut It Off

Homeowners can effectively save water with one simple practice: shutting irrigation systems off during and after rainstorms. For additional water savings, install rain barrels to collect rainwater from rain gutters for later use.

Rain Barrel

Shutterstock

Rain Barrel

Residents of Long Beach, Orange County, and Los Angeles can apply for rebates for installing rain barrels at their homes. From time to time, free barrels are also offered. Contact your local water agency or city and county officials for more information.

Energy Efficient

Energy Efficient

If it’s time to replace your washer and dryer, toilet, or dishwasher, consider purchasing energy-efficient, low-water-usage appliances. Many water agencies provide rebates for approved appliances or for installing soil moisture sensors in your garden. These sensors indicate when the soil has retained enough moisture to keep plants hydrated without sprinklers.

Clean-Up

Another important element of improving California’s water future is keeping waterways free of trash and debris. You can help by participating in local neighborhood or beach clean-ups.

For coastal communities, picking up trash on the beach prevents animals from accidentally ingesting garbage and keeps beaches clean for recreation.

For inland communities, picking up trash from streets and parks prevents it from washing into storm drains, rivers, and streams, then eventually traveling to the ocean. Several nonprofit organizations organize regular trash pick-ups, but you can also help by collecting trash you find when you go to the beach or park on your own.

Join Us!

Shutterstock

Join Us!

The Aquarium hosts a beach clean-up each September for California Coastal Clean-Up Day and leads monthly volunteer days at the Los Cerritos Wetlands. These habitat restoration sessions are held on every first Saturday of the month from 10:30 a.m. to 12:30 p.m.

Volunteers help to remove non-native plants, collect seeds from native plants for later use, and remove trash. For details, visit aquariumofpacific.org/events.

Runoff Matters

Shutterstock

Runoff Matters

Keep pollution out of the water system by properly disposing of any household hazardous waste, such as motor oil, paint, and pesticides.

When these substances enter storm drains after washing off of lawns or driveways as runoff, they can make their way into the ocean or groundwater basins that feed municipal water systems.

For more tips on water conservation and other ways to be an ocean steward, visit the Aquarium’s website at aquariumofpacific.org and click on Conservation.