Slow Money: It’s Like Slow Food For Your Wallet  cover

Slow Money: It’s Like Slow Food For Your Wallet

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The Wall Street Journal says of Slow Money: ‘Forget conventional 401(k)s; think goat cheese and fennel.’
Bloomberg Businessweek calls it one of the ‘big ideas that will change small business and entrepreneurship,’ and Time Magazine says it has the potential to ‘remake America’s food industry.’





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Slow Money: It’s Like Slow Food For Your Wallet

State of Affairs

The Wall Street Journal says of Slow Money: ‘Forget conventional 401(k)s; think goat cheese and fennel.’

Bloomberg Businessweek calls it one of the ‘big ideas that will change small business and entrepreneurship,’ and Time Magazine says it has the potential to ‘remake America’s food industry.’

Slow Money

Slow Money is a movement that organizes investors and donors to steer capital to small food enterprises, organic farms, and local food systems.

It’s guided by the same principles as the Slow Food movement. Slow Food promotes traditional cooking with local ingredients as a response to the unhealthy and unsustainable fast food lifestyle and the globalized, industrialized state of our food supply. Slow Money offers a similar alternative to the fast money of our global financial markets. It asserts that our current paths, both agricultural and fiduciary, are irresponsible, unhealthy, and ultimately unsustainable.

Get Involved

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Get Involved

You don’t need a big bank account to join the Slow Money movement.

Crowdsourcing

Kickstarter and Indiegogo have both had great success applying a crowdsourced funding platform to food-related projects.

They pool money in increments as small as a few dollars and patronage is usually rewarded in the form of project mementos or perks— a $10 pledge might entitle you to a snack bag from an organic nut roaster, or $200 to a pickle maker could get you a weekend brining workshop.

Lenders and Borrowers

Kiva Zip is a crowd-sourced platform for 0% interest peer-to-peer lending.

Lenders can browse individual loan profiles to choose a borrower—both food producers and sellers—approve the payback schedule, and even have direct conversations with borrowers. Loans are pooled from amounts as small as $5 PayPal transactions, and while there is risk involved, borrowers and business plans are vetted for credit-worthiness and are overseen and endorsed by trustees.

Mutually Beneficial

Mutually Beneficial

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Credibles

If an individual were to make a direct investment in an egg farm or a jam maker, payment in-kind would bring them more eggs and marmalade than they would know what to do with.

Credibles creates a single fund from the contributions of multiple investors, with buy-ins starting at $50. The loans it makes to small and artisanal producers are repaid in-kind—a farm returns crops, a restaurant returns meals, a small-batch ice cream maker returns pints of rocky road—but since an investor is buying into the shared pool, repayment comes from the collective pool of businesses in the form of edible credits, ‘credibles,’ that can be redeemed for a wide assortment of products.

Moving Forward

Gatheround, is like TED Talks for the Slow Money crowd.

Each live online event features a conversation with a thought leader from the food world plus presentations from several early stage food entrepreneurs who are seeking funding. A $25 donation logs you in, and at the end of the session you direct Gatheround to send those dollars in the form of a three-year, interest-free loan to the entrepreneur of your choice. When the loan is paid back, your tax-deductible $25 will continue to cycle through future Slow Money projects.

Making a Difference

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Making a Difference

SlowMoney.org mobilizes investors at a grassroots level through its network of regional chapters and local investment clubs.

Improving Food Systems

Since 2010, Slow Money affiliates have funneled more than $38 million to over 350 small food enterprises around the United States.

Visit the Slow Money website to learn about local gatherings, and join the emerging network of investors who are working to improve the health of local food systems and the economy.

Put your money where your mouth is. Literally.

Gigabiting

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