The Highway Serial Killer cover

The Highway Serial Killer

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More than 300 unsolved murders are linked to an FBI file that is never closed at the agency’s profiler base in Quantico – the Highway Serial Killer case.


Rating: 3 out of 5 stars on 3 reviews




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The Highway Serial Killer

The Highway Serial Killer

More than 300 unsolved murders are linked to an FBI file that is never closed at the agency’s profiler base in Quantico – the Highway Serial Killer case.

The ongoing confidential operation tracks a group of faceless lone wolf killers that are the most difficult to catch.

They are behind a spree of murders across the country dating back decades and are so notorious in the agency’s profiling unit that they have a category all their own – cross-country truckers.

Profiling a Killer

Profiling a Killer

©iStock

Just Passing Through

Over the years, the FBI has had some successes – but many are still out there.

They may be at the truck stop when you’re getting gas or maybe sitting alone in the roadside diner eating breakfast.

One thing is certain – they’re always on the move.

“They have a weird and loose affiliation with each other,” said former FBI profiler Jim Clemente. “They are mavericks and lone wolves. They don’t have any ties to the community; they’re just passing through.

Victims of Chime

Victims of Chime

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A Transient Lifestyle

“It takes a certain type of person to fit into this profile.

They pride themselves on their transient lifestyle.”

Jim says their victims have included prostitutes, runaways, drug addicts or simply people who were at the wrong place at the wrong time when the Highway Serial Killers were searching for prey.

Operations are continuing to track truckers who were known to be in the vicinity of unsolved murders.

Looking For Monsters

“The problem is that everyone looks around for monsters when these killers look similar to everyone else,” added Jim, who added that he couldn’t discuss individual cases.

Sometimes it comes down to an agent’s instincts to find a breakthrough in a case and that’s what happened when Jim helped catch the Beltway Sniper Killers, two murderers who claimed ten lives in the space of three weeks in the Washington DC area in October 2002.

Initially police suspected one white man with military experience was behind the killings.

Just Passing Through

Just Passing Through

©iStock

Playing God

But Jim explained: “I came up with the fact that there were two of them and that one was much older than the other.”

He based the hunch on the behavior shown in the killings, which were carried out with military precision and “massive self-control and focus.” But he spotted the letters the “killer” sent taunting police were unhinged and wildly written, not fitting the profile at all.

“Serial killers rarely work with other people. They tends to have a god complex and think they are better than everyone else,” he added, explaining why colleagues were cautious to go along with him at first.

Profiling The Killers

Jim also came up with the controversial theory that the younger killer had been sexually abused by the older one.

It turned out that one of the snipers, John Muhammed, 42, had indeed been molesting his accomplice, 17-year-old Lee Boyd Malvo.

His profiling changed the course of the investigation – and the killers were quickly arrested.