June Gardening Checklist: Fruit Trees cover

June Gardening Checklist: Fruit Trees

By


With the help of many gardening friends I have attempted to offer on these pages some useful information to help you with your own garden. Gardening is sharing. Any corrections, comments or suggestions are appreciated and will improve future information. Fruit trees are the focus of this NoteStream. Also see our NoteStreams on Ornamental Plants, Edible Plants and more.


Rating: 4 out of 5 stars on 5 reviews

"Very helpful" 5 stars by




NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

For a list of all authors on NoteStream, click here.




Read the NoteStream below, or download the app and read it on the go!



June Gardening Checklist: Fruit Trees

Fellow Gardeners,

The information, dates and techniques in this blog are as accurate as I can currently offer. During the past three decades I have cared for, nurtured and observed tens of thousands of plants.

With the help of many gardening friends I have attempted to offer on these pages some useful information to help you with your own garden. Gardening is sharing. Any corrections, comments or suggestions are appreciated and will improve future information.

Avocado Tree

Avocado Tree

Avocados

• Apply your third and final feeding to avocado trees this month. A mature avocado tree should be given between ½ and 1 pound of actual nitrogen per inch of trunk diameter. (Example: 15-30 pounds of 20% nitrogen if a six-inch trunk; 30-60 pounds of 10% nitrogen if a six-inch trunk, etc.)

• Avocados are still growing and they should look pretty good.

• Irrigate as needed to keep the soil moist, but not wet.

• This is a very good month for planting avocados. Being sub-tropical plants, avocados prefer to be planted at the beginning of the long warm part of the year.

Avocados (Cont.)

• Don’t be alarmed by a lot of leaf drop on mature plants. Avocados produce a lot of leaf litter nearly year round. This is a normal condition.

• Most varieties will not have fruit ready for harvest this early. However, other varieties are almost ready for picking. Varieties, like ‘Gwen’ and ‘Whitsell’ often have fruit at unusual times.

• Be sure to keep a very thick blanket of mulch, compost or fallen leaves under mature avocadoes at all times. Avocadoes need a cool root-run for good health.

Citrus Trees

Citrus Trees

Citrus Trees

• Citrus are still growing well this month and the leaves should be a healthy green color.

• Continue fertilizing for another month or two. Use a fertilizer that is rich in such trace minerals as iron, zinc, manganese, copper and others. These ingredients are usually well represented in organic fertilizers like Dr. Earth.

• Be attentive to irrigations now that the weather is warming up. The best application method is probably by flooding the root basin and letting it soak in once or twice. Do not use sprinklers, especially if they wet the trunk of the tree.

Citrus Trees (Cont.)

• Valencia oranges may look ripe, but before you pick them try a sample. If the sugars have developed sufficiently, then harvest more. If not, wait a few weeks and test again. Once ripe, Valencia oranges will keep on the tree for months.

• ‘Kara’ tangerines may be ripe by now or very soon. This about the only summer bearing mandarin and needs a warm inland location. Tangelos are about ripe now also.

• Continue periodically checking for ants. Control them from climbing up the trunk of the tree or onto the branches immediately. Although not directly harmful to the citrus, they are “farming” such pests as scale, whitefly and mealybug, which are all common on citrus.

Apple Tree

Apple Tree

Deciduous Fruit Trees

• With the warming weather, be sure to monitor the soil moisture and irrigate as needed.

• Early varieties of peaches and nectarines may be ripening this month and most apricots are also ripe now.

• If your trees did not perform a “drop” of a portion of their young fruit last month they may now. Remember, this is a normal process, since the tree cannot usually support all of the fruit that it originally sets.

Deciduous Fruit Trees (Cont.)

• After the “drop” is completed is the best time to thin any remaining fruit. This is one of the most difficult things for a gardener to do. However, well-spaced fruit will develop into a higher quality crop and the fruit size will be much larger as well.

• Birds often take their tool on ripening fruit, especially soft varieties like peach apricot, nectarine and plum. If this toll is too great, drape thin nylon “fruit tree” netting over the canopy of the tree a few weeks prior to the ripening date. Remove the netting once all the fruit has been harvested.