Marie Curie: A Gift of Radium cover

Marie Curie: A Gift of Radium

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This NoteStream is guest authored by Michelle Cadoree Bradley, a science reference specialist in the Science, Technology, and Business Division of the Library of Congress.
On May 20, 1921 Mme. Marie Curie, who co-discovered the radium element with her husband in 1898, received from the American people an appropriate, but hazardous gift—a gram of radium. In an interview with Mrs. W.B. (Marie) Meloney in the May 1920 issue of The Delineator magazine, Marie Curie disclosed that her lab had only a gram of radium to experiment with and that she needed more to continue researching.


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Marie Curie: A Gift of Radium

Fund Raising

On May 20, 1921 Mme. Marie Curie, who co-discovered the radium element with her husband in 1898, received from the American people an appropriate, but hazardous gift—a gram of radium.

In an interview with Mrs. W.B. (Marie) Meloney in the May 1920 issue of The Delineator magazine, Marie Curie disclosed that her lab had only a gram of radium to experiment with and that she needed more to continue researching.

After learning about Curie’s predicament, Mrs. Meloney formed the Marie Curie Radium Fund to raise money to purchase another gram of radium, worth $100,000 (in the 1920s), for Mme. Marie Curie. In less than a year, the Marie Curie Radium Fund secured enough donations from American women to purchase a gram of radium.

Postage Portrait of Marie Curie

Postage Portrait of Marie Curie

©iStock.com

Remarks from the President

In a White House ceremony in 1921 President Warren Harding assembled a group of distinguished scientists and diplomats from America, France and Poland to present Marie Curie the gift.

“We greet you as foremost among scientists in the age of science, as leader among women in the generation which sees woman come tardily into her own. We greet you as an exemplar of liberty’s victories in the generation wherein liberty has won her crown of glory. In doing honor to you we testify anew our pride in the ancient friendships which have bound us to both the country of your adoption and that of your nativity”

Marie Curie, Paris (1921)

Marie Curie, Paris (1921)

Marie Sklodowska Curie, 1867-1934,

holding arm of Pres Harding after she was presented a gram of radium on behalf of the women of America

Good Research

You can research this event in history by using historic newspapers from the Library’s Chronicling America project (search Marie Curie Radium Fund). A great deal can be discovered about a particular time or event from news reports.

Teachers and students will also find this primary resource helpful with the following:

The popularization of science in America

The role of women’s organizations and groups in funding

Information on radium’s use in medicine and other products

Marie Curie (1920)

Marie Curie (1920)

Image by MaterialScientist.

(CC BY 2.0)

More Information

If you wish to learn more about Marie Curie, take a look at the American Institute of Physics (AIP) Marie Curie and the Science of Radioactivity. This site offers an in depth look into Curie’s personal and professional life, as well as the historical context of her time.

The site contains textual information, which is accompanied by digitized images of photographs, illustrations, and other primary sources (for example, an original lab notebook). The information is presented in chronological fashion and is broken down into various phases of Marie Curie’s life.