Eunice R. Miles: Gemologist cover

Eunice R. Miles: Gemologist

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This segment is about reminding our readers how women continue to make a difference in the jewelry industry. Recently during the Las Vegas show a question came up about Eunice Miles. My first thought, that would be a great segment for Ask A Gemologist.


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Eunice R. Miles: Gemologist

Eunice R. Miles

Today’s question is about diamond treatments, fillers, diamond look-alikes and making a difference. Before we begin, let me emphasize the obvious: During general observation, always check for coated diamonds first!

Fooled you - this segment is about reminding our readers how women continue to make a difference in the jewelry industry. Recently during the Las Vegas show a question came up about Eunice Miles. My first thought, that would be a great segment for Ask A Gemologist.

Eunice R. Miles

Eunice R. Miles

Image Courtesy GIA

History Maker

Eunice R. Miles, G.G., 1917 - 1997, was the first female gemologist/researcher in the GIA Laboratory. Her GIA career began in 1953.

She made history by becoming the first woman to join then GIA’s Gem Trade Laboratory, in New York. In 1963 she did it again when Gems and Gemology (Winter 1962–63, Vol. 10, No. 12, pp. 355–364, 383) published her article Diamond-Coating Techniques and Methods of Detection.

In 1963, she was acknowledged in the U.S. Department of Mines annual report for advancing diamond research with her two-year investigation into detecting coated diamonds. Later, the FBI used her data to arrest a major coated-diamond dealer.

Do Not Pass Go

Do Not Pass Go

In Her Own Words

In her words, the article’s objective was “to present for the first time in print a discussion of the practice of raising the color grade of certain diamonds to near-colorless by disguising the true light-yellow or brown body color by the application of a foreign substance to the surface of the stone.”

Eunice’s commendations demonstrate her professional diversify as a gemologist, designer, educator, and writer. In 1984 Eunice was elected an honorary fellow of the Gemmological Association of Great Britain, now Gem-A. In 1985 she became an honorary member of the American Gem Trade Association (AGTA).

Is It Real?

Is It Real?

Awards And Honors

In 1985 the International Society of Appraisers (ISA) presented Eunice with its “Gems and Jewelry Industry Service Award,” and in 1986 GIA named Eunice as the first recipient of the “Eunice Miles Lifetime Achievement in Gemology” award.

In 1987 the Women’s Jewelry Association inducted Eunice Miles into its Hall of Fame.

The Manhattan Chapter of the GIA Alumni Association honored Eunice in 1988. Under the leadership of Gail Brett Levine, of the National Association of Jewelry Appraisers (NAJA), the Eunice Miles Scholarship Fund was founded. Each year the Chapter contributes to the fund to assist students attending GIA to further their educational endeavors.

Sweet Success

Sweet Success

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Make Your Own History

So . . . let’s take a moment and look around our industry today. Who are the women you know making a difference? Maybe it’s you! Have you considered what your legacy will be?

Don’t worry, you don’t need to focus on your legacy just do what Eunice Miles did, give it your best every day, love what you do, and continue to share your enthusiasm for life. The rest will take care of it’s self, it’s inevitable.

You too may be making history right now!