Italy's Renaissance 04: Florence Sculpture cover

Italy's Renaissance 04: Florence Sculpture

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Commonly known as "the cradle of the Renaissance," 15th-century Florence was among the largest and richest cities in Europe and its wealthiest residents were enthusiastic patrons of the arts, particularly sculpture. Departing from the International Gothic style that had previously dominated in Italy, and drawing from the styles of classical antiquity, Renaissance sculpture originated in Florence and was consciously influenced by ancient Roman sculpture. Quiz question at the end to show you got it!
Originally posted by Boundless (CC BY-SA 4.0)





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Italy's Renaissance 04: Florence Sculpture

Sculpture

Renaissance sculpture originated in Florence in the 15th century and was deeply influenced by ancient Roman sculpture.

Learning Objective

Identify the impetus behind the sculptural output in 15th century Florence, its major exponents, and their best known works

Terms

baptistry A designated space within a church, or a separate room or building associated with a church, where a baptismal font is located, and consequently, where the sacrament of Christian baptism (via aspersion or affusion) is performed.

lost wax A method of casting a sculpture in which a model of the sculpture is made from wax: the model is used to make a mould; when the mould has set, the wax is made to melt and is poured away, leaving the mould ready to be used to cast the sculpture.

allegory The representation of abstract principles by characters or figures.

Brunelleschi

Public Domain

Brunelleschi

Statue of Filippo Brunelleschi near the "Duomo Santa Maria del Fiore" looking up to the Dome

Key Points

1) Renaissance sculpture proper is often taken to begin with the famous competition for the doors of the Florence baptistry in 1403, which was won by Lorenzo Ghiberti.

2) Ghiberti designed a set of doors for the competition, housed in the northern entrance, and another more splendid pair for the eastern entrance, named the Gates of Paradise. Both these gates depict biblical scenes.

3) Ghiberti set up a large workship in which many famous Florentine sculptors and artists were trained. He reinvented the lost-wax casting of bronze, a technique which had been used by the ancient Romans and subsequently lost.

4) Donatello created his bronze David for Cosimo de' Medici. Conceived independent of any architectural surroundings, it was the first known free-standing nude statue produced since antiquity.

5) The period was marked by a great increase in patronage of sculpture by the state for public art and by the wealthy for their homes.Public sculpture became a crucial element in the appearance of historic city centers, and portrait sculpture, particularly busts, became hugely popular in Florence.

Lorenzo Ghiberti

Commonly known as "the cradle of the Renaissance," 15th-century Florence was among the largest and richest cities in Europe and its wealthiest residents were enthusiastic patrons of the arts, particularly sculpture. Departing from the International Gothic style that had previously dominated in Italy, and drawing from the styles of classical antiquity, Renaissance sculpture originated in Florence and was consciously influenced by ancient Roman sculpture.

Renaissance sculpture proper is often taken to begin with the famous competition for the doors of the Florence baptistry in 1403, from which the trial models submitted by the winner, Lorenzo Ghiberti, and the runner up, Filippo Brunelleschi, still survive.

Gates of Paradise

Ricardo André Frantz, (CC BY-SA 3.0)

Gates of Paradise

Gates of Paradise, by Ghiberti. Battistero di San Giovanni (Florence)

The Gates of Paradise

Ghiberti's bronze doors consist of 28 panels depicting scenes from the life of Christ, the four evangelists, and the Church Fathers: Saints Ambrose, Jeromy, Gregory, and Augustine.

They took 21 years to complete and still stand at the northern entrance of the baptistry, although they are eclipsed by the splendor of his second pair of gates for the eastern entrance, which Michelangelo dubbed "the gates of paradise."

These new doors were commissioned in 1425 and built over a 27-year period. They consist of ten rectangular panels, depicting scenes from the Old Testament and employ a clever use of the recently discovered principles of perspective to add depth to the composition. They are surrounded by a richly decorated gilt framework of fruit and foliage, statuettes of prophets, and busts of the sculptor and his father.

Donatello

In order to carry out these huge commissions, Ghiberti set up a large workshop in which many famous Florentine sculptors and artists trained in later years, including Donatello, Michelozzo, and Paolo Uccello. He reinvented the lost wax casting of bronze, a technique which had been used by the ancient Romans and subsequently lost. This made his workshop particularly famous and was a great draw for aspiring artists.

Another deeply influential sculptor from Florence was Donatello (1386 - 1466) , who is best known for his work in bas-relief, a form of shallow relief that he used as a medium for the incorporation of significant 15th century sculptural developments in perspectival illusion.

Donatello's David

Patrick A. Rodgers, (CC BY-SA 2.0)

Donatello's David

Donatello's genius made him an important figure in the early Italian Renaissance period.

Sculpted between 1430-32, his bronze David is an example of his mature work. It is currently located in the Bargello Palace and Museum.

Early Training and Influences

Donatello received his early artistic training in a goldsmith's workshop.

He then trained briefly in Ghiberti's studio before undertaking a trip to Rome with Filippo Brunelleschi, where he undertook the study and excavation of Roman architecture and sculpture. Roman art became the single most important influence on Donatello's work.

His foremost sponsor in Florence was Cosimo de'Medici, the city's foremost patron of art. Donatello created his bronze David for Cosimo's court in the Palazzo Medici. Conceived entirely in the round and independent of any architectural surroundings, it was the first known free-standing nude statue produced since antiquity and represented an allegory of civic virtues overcoming brutality and ignorance.

This sculpture represented a particularly important development in Renaissance sculpture; namely the production of sculpture independent of architecture unlike the preceding International Gothic style where sculpture rarely existed independent of architecture .

Other Important Works

Donatello's other important projects in and near Florence include the marble pulpit of the facade of the Prato cathedral, the carved Cantoria or choir at the Florence Duomo, which was influenced by ancient sarcophagi and Byzantine ivory chests, the Annunciation scene for the Cavalcanti altar in the church of Santa Croce, and a bust of a Young Man with a Cameo, the first example of a lay bust portrait since the classical era.

The period was marked by a great increase in patronage of sculpture by the state for public art as well as by the wealthy for their homes. Public sculpture became a crucial element in the appearance of historic city centers, and portrait sculpture, particularly busts, became hugely popular in Florence following Donatello's innovations. These 15th-century innovations soon spread throughout Italy and later through the rest of Europe.

Question

Which of the following was NOT associated with 15th century Florentine sculpture?

A Michelangelo

B Ghiberti

C Donatello

D Brunelleschi

Answer

A Michelangelo

Boundless , (CC BY-SA 4.0)

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