Profile: ushistory.org

History for the Mind....and Heart

USHistory.org was launched on July 4, 1995, by the Independence Hall Association, to support its mission to educate the public about the Colonial and Revolutionary eras of our nation's history, and of Philadelphia generally. Our first project was a Virtual Tour of Philadelphia's Historic District, 'The Most Historic Mile in America.' Today, it has grown into a 'Congress of Websites,' which is a combination of original content, websites of partner organizations, and advocacy support websites.

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Ancient Greece: The Olympic Games

This is the final installment in a series of articles on Ancient Greece. To begin at the beginning, please click here.
US History
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Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Alexander The Great

Alexander the Great amassed the largest empire in the ancient world, and smashed the Persian Empire. But historians often see him in a darker light. Was Alexander the Great really great?
This is the 8th in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To begin at the beginning, please click here.
US History
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Thinkers

Socrates, Plato and Aristotle were some of the greatest thinkers of ancient Greece, yet Socrates was sentenced to death, Plato really wasn't very democratic, and Aristotle thought the sun revolved around the Earth.
But they did change the way people thought - and usually for the better.
This is the 7th in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To begin at the beginning, please click here.
ushistory.org
Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License

Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Art and Architecture

This it the sixth in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To start at the beginning, please click here.
This installment dips into Art and Architecture.

Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Greek Literature

This it the fifth in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To start at the beginning, please click here.
This installment covers the importance of Theater and Literature. Brief excerpts from "The Illiad" by Homer, "To Aphrodite" by Sappho, "Medea" by Euripedes, and "The Frogs" by Aristophanes are included.

Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Gods, Goddesses, and Heroes

This it the fourth in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To start at the beginning, please click here.
In ancient Greece, myths were often used to help explain the mysterious and often to teach a lesson. The Greek gods were emotional, fought amongst themselves and with humans, cheated lied, and altogether behaved in a very human way.

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Ancient Greece: Democracy Is Born

This it the third in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To start at the beginning, please click here.
In Athenian democracy, every citizen was required to participate or suffer punishment. This practice stands in stark contrast to modern democratic governments in which citizens can choose whether or not they wish to participate. In Athenian democracy, all citizens pulled their weight.

Category: History

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Ancient Greece: Rise of City-States: Athens and Sparta

This it the second in a series of nine articles on Ancient Greece. To start at the beginning, please click here.
The Greek peninsula has two distinctive geographic features that influenced the development of Greek society. First, Greece has easy access to water. The land contains countless scattered islands, deep harbors, and a network of small rivers. This easy access to water meant that the Greek people might naturally become explorers and traders.

Category: History

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Ancient Greece

Many of the fundamental elements of Western culture first arose more than 2000 years ago in ancient Greece.
This is the first article in a series of 9.

Category: History

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The Fall of the Roman Empire

The invading army reached the outskirts of Rome, which had been left totally undefended. In 410 C.E., the Visigoths, led by Alaric, breached the walls of Rome and sacked the capital of the Roman Empire.
The Visigoths looted, burned, and pillaged their way through the city, leaving a wake of destruction wherever they went. The plundering continued for three days. For the first time in nearly a millennium, the city of Rome was in the hands of someone other than the Romans. This was the first time that the city of Rome was sacked, but by no means the last.

Category: History

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Gladiators, Chariots, and the Roman Games

Two men ready their weapons. An excited crowd of Romans cheer loudly in anticipation. Both combatants realize full well that this day might be their last. They are gladiators, men who fight to the death for the enjoyment of others.
As the two gladiators circle each other, each knows that his objective is to maim or trap his opponent rather than to kill him quickly. What's more, the fight must last long enough to please the crowd.

Category: History

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Life of the People in the Roman Empire

The quality of life in the Roman Empire depended upon where one fell within society.
During the Pax Romana, the wealthy built huge, lavishly decorated houses and usually had servants or slaves to tend to their every need. The average citizen worked hard and lived reasonably comfortably in modest housing. Despite the riches of the Roman Empire, the largest class lived in what can only be described as poverty.
This is the fourth in a series. For part one, please start with here for The Roman Republic.

Category: History

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The Pax Romana

The term "Pax Romana," which literally means "Roman peace," refers to the time period from 27 B.C.E. to 180 C.E. in the Roman Empire.
This 200-year period saw unprecedented peace and economic prosperity throughout the Empire, which spanned from England in the north to Morocco in the south and Iraq in the east. During the Pax Romana, the Roman Empire reached its peak in terms of land area, and its population swelled to an estimated 70 million people.
This is the third in a series. For part one, please start with here for The Roman Republic.

Category: History

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Ancient Rome: Julius Caesar

On the steps of the Senate, the most powerful man in the ancient world died in a pool of his own blood.
This is the second in a series. For part one, please start with here for The Roman Republic.

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Ancient Rome: The Roman Republic

It all began when the Romans overthrew their Etruscan conquerors in 509 B.C.E. Centered north of Rome, the Etruscans had ruled over the Romans for hundreds of years. Once free, the Romans established a republic, a government in which citizens elected representatives to rule on their behalf. A republic is quite different from a democracy, in which every citizen is expected to play an active role in governing the state.
This is the first in a series of six articles.

Category: History

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