Profile: Wendi Maloney

Writer-Editor

Wendi Maloney, a writer-editor at the U.S. Copyright Office, is serving a detail in the Library’s Office of Communications. She is managing the Library of Congress blog and writing stories for the Library’s staff newsletter and other publications. Before arriving at the Copyright Office in 2007, Wendi was publications director at the American Association of University Professors for nearly a decade. She has also worked at the American Historical Association, Time-Life Books, and Yale University Press. Wendi has a bachelor’s degree in history from the University of California, Los Angeles, and a master’s degree in history from the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

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NoteStreams By Wendi Maloney

Rare Book of the Month: A Revolutionary Woman and the Declaration of Independence

Mary Katherine Goddard (1738–1816) lived during remarkable times in early American history, and she did not sit idly by observing events. Instead, this brave and industrious woman actively took part in helping to found a new republic through use of her printing press.
She may not be a household name, but one item she printed is: an early edition of the Declaration of Independence, the first with all the names of the signers on the document.
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: 4th of July

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Inquiring Minds: Tracking the Polar Adventures of a Rich American Dame

Between 1926 and 1955, Louise Arner Boyd financed, organized and photographically documented seven Arctic expeditions, achieving international notoriety for her work.
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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World War I: American Jazz Delights the World

In the afterglow of the armistice in 1918 that ended World War I, Europe, and particularly the city of Paris, exhibited a wild exuberance. Future civil rights pioneer and American Expeditionary Forces (AEF) officer Charles Hamilton Houston encapsulated the mood and sounds of European joy: “Paris is taken away with [jazz] and our style of dancing,” he wrote in his diary.
This is a guest post by Ryan Reft, a historian in the Manuscript Division.
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: Music

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Papers of Famous Sculptor Confirm Identity of Mount Rushmore’s Chief Carver

Last month, relatives of Luigi Del Bianco gathered in Keystone, South Dakota, for a very special ceremony: the National Park Service unveiled a plaque on September 16 at the Mount Rushmore National Memorial recognizing the late Del Bianco as the chief carver of Mount Rushmore—76 years after its completion.
Library of Congress Blog

Category: History

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History’s Greatest Birthday Card: The Polish Declarations

In 1926, for the 150th anniversary of the birth of the United States, the Polish people presented President Calvin Coolidge with 111 volumes signed not only by many of the political and cultural leaders of Poland, but also by more than 5 million school children and their teachers.
This is a guest post by Sahr Conway-Lanz, a historian in the Manuscript Division.
Library Of Congress Blog

Category: History

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Setting the Record Straight on Pirates and Their Wives

Pirate lore has long captivated us and, through the centuries, worked its way into our literature, movies and popular culture. But many depictions of pirates are wrong, distorting our understanding of them. So writes Daphne Palmer Geanacopoulos in her new book, “The Pirate Next Door: The Untold Story of Eighteenth Century Pirates’ Wives, Families and Communities.”
Library Of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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World War I: Footlocker’s Contents Reveal Soldier’s Story

When I saw a World War I-era footlocker and its contents for sale on eBay, I scooped it up. It arrived full of items I had hoped for—a helmet, a haversack—but also of surprises, from a pouch filled with 100-year-old tobacco to the biggest surprise of them all: many of the items were marked with a name, C.F. Stensen.
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: Military History

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Happy 100th Birthday, I. M. Pei

Chinese-American architect Ieoh Ming Pei celebrates his 100th birthday on April 26, 2017. The Library of Congress is fortunate to have original design sketches by I. M. Pei as well as thousands of his manuscript papers.
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: Arts

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