Profile: University of Cambridge

With more than 18,000 students from all walks of life and all corners of the world, nearly 9,000 staff, 31 Colleges and 150 Departments, Faculties, Schools and other institutions, no two days are ever the same at the University of Cambridge.
At the heart of this confederation of Departments, Schools, Faculties and Colleges is a central administration team. It is small because the Colleges are self-governing and teaching staff carry out much of the daily administration at Cambridge.

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NoteStreams By University of Cambridge

Frankly, Do We Give a Damn…? Study Finds Links Between Swearing and Honesty

It’s long been associated with anger and coarseness but profanity can have another, more positive connotation. Psychologists have learned that people who frequently curse are being more honest. Writing in the journal Social Psychological and Personality Science a team of researchers from the Netherlands, the UK, the USA and Hong Kong report that people who use profanity are less likely to be associated with lying and deception.
University of Cambridge
CC BY 4.0

Category: Social Awareness

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Russian Paintings in the Limelight

An exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery features paintings of some of Russia’s legendary creative figures. Russia and the Arts, which draws attention to a generation of overlooked artists, is curated by Dr Rosalind P Blakesley.
University of Cambridge
CC BY 4.0

Category: Arts

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The Adventures of Sir Kenelm Digby: Pirate, Philosopher & Foodie

Aged 24, Sir Kenelm Digby raised a fleet to sail against the enemy French in the Mediterranean, as his family name lay covered in shadow. Joe Moshenska (Faculty of English) looks at the intellectual, political and culinary life of a man driven by a thirst for knowledge.
Forced to put in at Algiers, his filthy ships were scoured and replacement crew recruited. Digby hobnobbed with local dignitaries, and feasted on partridges and “Melons of marveilous goodnesse”.
University of Cambridge
(CC BY 4.0)

Category: History

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The Booker Prize: Sideways Look At The Literary Puff

A literary puff is the promotional blurb that appears on book jackets and publishers’ press releases. Dr Ross Wilson, Faculty of English, discusses the nature of the rave review and asks whether it counts as criticism.

Category: Book Club

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Attitudes About Death Among the Very Old

Discussing death with elderly loved ones is difficult, but fulfilling their final wishes may help ease discomfort during their final days.

Category: Health

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The Language and Literature of Chastity

In her debut book, Dr Bonnie Lander Johnson (Faculty of English) shows how deeply the Christian virtue of chastity was embedded into the culture of the early Stuart world. In the struggle between the newly established Church of England and Roman Catholicism, chastity was a powerful construct that was both personal and political.
Virginity was an anatomical state; chastity was a state, both spiritual and psychological, that could be observed through all stages of a person’s adult life.
Bonnie Lander Johnson

Category: Book Club

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