Profile: Tim St. Onge

Cartographer

Tim St. Onge is a Cartographer and GIS analyst in the Geography and Map Division. As a member of the Congressional Cartography Program, Tim conducts geospatial analysis and creates maps for congressional Members and staff, Geography and Map Division colleagues, and researchers across the Library of Congress. Additionally, Tim is involved in GIS technology research, geospatial data preservation, and database management projects. Before arriving at the Library of Congress in July 2015, Tim earned a Bachelor’s degree in Geography and a GIS Certificate from the University of Mary Washington, as well as a Master’s degree in Geographic Information Science for Development and Environment from Clark University. He has further developed years of expertise in GIS through positions in federal government, local government, and the private sector. Common areas of focus in Tim’s research include spatial analysis concepts, emerging geospatial technologies and the use of GIS to understand and address persistent urban problems such as crime, poverty, and residential segregation.

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NoteStreams By Tim St. Onge

Places in Civil War History: The Battle of Dranesville

This is part of a series of guest posts from Ed Redmond, Cartographic Specialist in the Library of Congress, Geography and Map Division, documenting the cartographic history of maps related to the American Civil War, 1861-1865. The posts will appear on a regular basis.
Library Of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps in Literature and Beyond: Map Monsters

This is the seventh article in a series of eight on imaginary maps, written by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. To begin with the first NoteStream in the series, please click here.
As users of Twitterand Instagram have discovered, there is a lot of whimsy to be found on 16th and 17th century maps in the form of sea creatures.
Commonly referred to as “map monsters,” these creatures adorn maps on spaces that are usually left blank or in spots where the geography of the world was still unknown. What was their purpose when they were created, and why are they so popular today?
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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World War I: Understanding the War at Sea Through Maps

Soldiers leaping from trenches and charging into an apocalyptic no man’s land dominate the imagination when it comes to World War I. However, an equally dangerous and strategically critical war at sea was waged between the Central Powers and the Allies, with Germany and Great Britain as the primary belligerents.
World War I Centennial, 2017-2018: With the most comprehensive collection of multi-format World War I holdings in the nation, the Library of Congress is a unique resource for public programs and on-site visitor experiences about The Great War including exhibits, symposia and book talks.
The following guest post is by Ryan Moore, a cartographic specialist in the Geography and Map Division. This blog post originally appeared in the Library of Congress Blog.

Category: Military History

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Imaginary Maps: Half-Real, Half-Imaginary

This is the sixth article in a series of eight on imaginary maps, written by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. To begin with the first NoteStream in the series, please click here.
Today, we examine maps of fictional stories that take place in the world around us instead of the worlds in the pages of books. Like the fans of Dante’s Inferno who felt compelled to map his world, fans of other books had the same impulse to map real world settings in relation to the stories they read. Lovers of Jane Austen, Shakespeare and George R. R. Martin have a lot in common.
Library Of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps: Children's Stories

This is the fifth article in a series on imaginary maps, written by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. To begin with the first NoteStream in the series, please click here.
From Winnie the Pooh to Harry Potter - maps aren't always reliable!
Library of Congress Blogs

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps: “Different Roads Sometimes Lead to the Same Castle”

This is the fourth article in a series of eight on imaginary maps, written by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. To begin with the first NoteStream in the series, please click here.

Sometimes the maps in fiction are only the beginning. In this installment, we'll take a different look at The Lord of the Rings series and The Land of Ice and Fire series.
Library Of Congress

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps: “Not all those who wander are lost”

This is the third article in a series of eight on imaginary maps, written by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. To begin with the first NoteStream in the series, please click here.
Funny thing: J.R.R. Tolkein and George R.R. Martin both were heavily influenced by history when creating their Imaginary Maps.
Library Of Congress

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps in Literature & Beyond: Middle Ages & the Renaissance

Did you know some of the earliest imaginary maps date to the Middle Ages?
This is Part 2 of an eight part series on Imaginary Maps in Literature and Beyond by Hannah Stahl, a Library Technician in the Geography & Map Division. Read the first post in the series here.

Category: History

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Imaginary Maps in Literature and Beyond: Introduction

An English major obsessed with maps?! Naturally! How else to follow the travels of the pilgrims in The Canterbury Tales, or find out where Elizabeth Bennet and Fitzwilliam Darcy fell in love!
This is the first article in a series of eight.

Category: History

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