Profile: The Victorian Web

The Victorian Web, which originated in hypermedia environments (Intermedia, Storyspace) that existed long before the World Wide Web, is one of the oldest academic and scholarly websites. It takes an approach that differs markedly from many Internet projects. Today the Internet offers many excellent resources — and we use them often! — such as Project Gutenberg, the Internet Archive, the Library of Congress, and British Listed Buildings. These sites take the form of archives that quite properly preserve their information in the form of separate images or entire books accessible via search tools. The Victorian Web, in contrast, presents its images and documents, including entire books, as nodes in a network of complex connections. In other words, it emphasizes the link rather than the search tool (though it has one) and presents information linked to other information rather than atomized and isolated.

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NoteStreams By The Victorian Web

Shadows of Things That Have Been and Will Be in Great Expectations

When Pip sees the “shadows" around Estella, is he seeing Miss Havisham's influence, or is it a second-sight type of thing? Why is there still no shadow in the original ending?
The Victorian Web

Category: Book Club

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Two Versions of Marley's Ghost

Numerous artists illustrated early editions of Charles Dickens' A Christmas Carol. Here we look at two in particular: John Leech, who illustrated the first edition, and Fred Barnard.
The Victorian Web

Category: Book Club

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The British Empire in Kipling's Day

In Kipling's day, it was said "the sun never sets on the British Empire". Indeed, by the late 19th century, it covered nearly one quarter of the land surface of the earth, and counted more than a quarter of the world's population.
Author: David Cody, Associate professor of English, Hartwick College

Category: Book Club

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Great Expectations & The Convict System in 19th Century England

Dickens used a model of English prisons and convicts that was at least a decade earlier than the time the novel was set. Let's see why he might have chosen to do this!
Author Serra Ansay

Category: Book Club

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