Profile: The National Museum Of American History

Through incomparable collections, rigorous research, and dynamic public outreach, we explore the infinite richness and complexity of American history. We help people understand the past in order to make sense of the present and shape a more humane future.

The National Museum of American History collects and preserves more than 3 million artifacts—all true national treasures. We take care of everything from the original Star-Spangled Banner and Abraham Lincoln’s top hat to Dizzy Gillespie’s angled trumpet and Dorothy’s ruby slippers from The Wizard of Oz. Our collections form a fascinating mosaic of American life and comprise the greatest single collection of American history.

NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

See the full list of Authors here: link




NoteStreams By The National Museum Of American History

Women in World War I: Belgian War Lace

This is the 4th post in the Women in World War 1 series. To begin with the Introduction, please click here.
The laces made in Belgium during World War I are an important part of the lace holdings of the Division of Home and Community Life's Textile Collection in the Smithsonian's National Museum of American History. They are representative of laces made by about 50,000 lace makers, many of whom were women, throughout Belgium from 1914 through 1919, especially during the Great War.
The National Museum of American History
Credit for the written content of this section goes to Karen Thompson and Doris Bowman from the Division of Home and Community Life.

Category: History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Women in World War I: French Stitchery

This is the 3rd post in the Women in World War 1 series. To begin with the Introduction, please click here.
The objects in this section are embroidered household items, which at first glance may seem quaint and unconnected to the hardships of living in a war zone. However, these objects and their backstory show how profoundly World War I affected civilian women and how these women fought to meet the challenges of war.
The National Museum of American History

Category: Military History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Women in World War I: Women's Uniforms

This is the 2nd post in the Women in World War 1 series. To begin with the Introduction, please click here.
The Great War saw tens of thousands of women, American and otherwise, don uniforms to take on their war work. What is so striking about the uniforming of American women during World War I is that it occurred in all parts of women's war efforts. Whether attached to the military or to voluntary organizations, working in factories, on farms, or filling in other occupations as men left for overseas service, women wore uniforms.
The National Museum of American History

Category: History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Women in World War I: Introduction

World War I was without a doubt a watershed event for women’s military service in the United States and elsewhere. However, we do not want to restrict our definition of women in the military to only women who served in the military.
Instead, we want to broaden our understanding to include the women whose lives were affected by the military and the war: women who were left on the home front, women who saw their husbands and sons go off to fight, women in Europe who experienced the war firsthand as it ravaged their hometowns, and even the women in media and art who symbolically represented freedom, virtue, and victory and spurred their countrymen and women to arms.
The National Museum of American History

Category: Military History

View NoteStreamSave to App