Profile: The Conversation - Nature

Academic rigor, journalistic flair

The Conversation US launched as a pilot project in October 2014. It is an independent source of news and views from the academic and research community, delivered direct to the public.
Our team of professional editors work with university and research institute experts to unlock their knowledge for use by the wider public.
Access to independent, high quality, authenticated, explanatory journalism underpins a functioning democracy. Our aim is to promote better understanding of current affairs and complex issues. And hopefully allow for a better quality of public discourse and conversation.
We aim to help rebuild trust in journalism. All authors and editors sign up to our Editorial Charter. All contributors must abide by our Community Standards policy. We only allow authors to write on a subject on which they have proven expertise, which they must disclose alongside their article. Authors’ funding and potential conflicts of interest must also be disclosed. Failure to do so carries a risk of being banned from contributing to the site.

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NoteStreams By The Conversation - Nature

Zoos Aren’t Victorian-era Throwbacks: They’re Important in Saving Species

While zoos began as 19th-century menageries, they’ve come a long way since then. They’re responsible for saving 10 iconic species worldwide. Without captive breeding and reintroduction efforts, there might be no Californian Condor or Przewalski’s Horse – the only truly wild horse – left in the wild.
Post by Alienor Chauvenet
Alienor Chauvenet is a Friend of The Conversation.
Postdoctoral Research Fellow, The University of Queensland
The Conversation
CC BY-ND 4.0

Category: Science

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Saving Mexico’s Endangered Sea Turtles Will be Good for Tourism Too

Mexico has detected a sharp decrease in the populations of Leatherback turtle (Dermochelys coriacea), and the species is now critically endangered.
The Conversation
(CC BY-ND 4.0)

Category: Nature

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Will China Lead on Climate Change?

Because of the congruence between reducing coal use and greenhouse gas emissions, China would be likely to make substantial efforts to shift to lower emissions technologies over the next decade whether they cared about global emissions or not.
The Conversation
(CC BY-ND 4.0)

Category: Social Awareness

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Cuba’s Sustainable Agriculture At Risk in U.S. Thaw

If relations with U.S. agribusiness companies are not managed carefully, Cuba could revert to an industrial approach that relies on mechanization, transgenic crops and agrochemicals, rolling back the revolutionary gains that its campesinos have achieved.
The Conversation
(CC BY-ND 4.0)

Category: Social Awareness

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National Parks Preserve Our History and Culture

Along with protecting natural wonders, such as Yellowstone National Park’s geysers, the National Park Service is charged with preserving cultural resources that are relevant to living communities.
The Conversation
(CC BY-ND 4.0)

Category: Nature

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A Separate Species: the ‘Coywolf’

Recently, Roland Kays penned an interesting article in The Conversation concluding that “coywolf is not a thing,” and that it should not be considered for species status.

Category: Nature

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Why More Cities Need to Add Up the Economic Value of Trees

Not just a way to beat the heat, urban forests also reduce air pollution and provide other services for the economy.

Category: Nature

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Handle With Care – The World’s 5 Deadliest Poisons

Assessing toxicity is not easy. Nevertheless, here is a representative selection of five deadly poisons, each at least a hundred times more toxic than cyanide, arsenic or strychnine.

Category: Nature

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Scalia’s Death and the Environment

Scalia argued that the Clean Water Act should be narrowly construed to apply only to “relatively permanent bodies of water” rather than, as the lower courts had consistently ruled for over 30 years, to the entire tributary systems of the nation’s major waterways.

Category: Social Awareness

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Sierra Nevada Snowpack is at a Record Low

In the Mediterranean climate of California, with its warm, wet winters and hot, dry summers, the snowpack in the Sierra Nevada Mountains plays a critical role. It serves as a natural water storage system that feeds waterways and reservoirs during the dry summer months. That’s why it was very fitting that when Governor Jerry Brown announced the first-ever mandatory statewide water restrictions, he did it from the snow-barren Phillips snow course station in the Sierra Nevada. The April 1 snowpack’s water content has been measured at this station since 1941 and has averaged at 66.5 inches over this period. On April 1 2015, there was no snow on the ground.

Category: Nature

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How Many Trees are on Earth?

Although the field of forest ecology is quite advanced, until now, policymakers and scientists have relied primarily on satellite images to provide estimates of global forest area. So just how many trees are out there? One billion, ten billion, one hundred billion?

Category: Science

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Concrete Jungles: Growing Ranks of Urban Wildlife

Several times this spring, coyotes made national headlines when spotted roaming the streets of New York, from Manhattan to Queens. In recent years, a host of charismatic wild species, the coyote being only the most famous, have returned to American cities in numbers not seen for generations. Yet the official response in many areas has been, at best, disorganized, and people’s responses varied. The time has come for us to accept that these animals are here to stay, and develop a new approach to urban wildlife.

Category: Nature

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Soften the Environmental Impact of the Olympics

The International Olympic Committee (IOC) just announced that Beijing will host the 2022 Winter Olympics. There will no doubt be many surprises during the Games, but we already know there will be a substantial environmental toll to locating in Beijing. Where will the snow come from for a winter event in a city and region that has little snow? Events needing altitude, such as skiing and snowboarding, will be held between 55 and 100 miles away, with some of them being held on the edge of the Gobi Desert, where snowfall rarely exceeds 10 inches.

Category: Social Awareness

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Could ‘Balanced Harvesting’ Really Feed the World and Save the Oceans?

Balanced harvesting is a philosophy that advocates spreading fishing pressure evenly across the ecosystem instead of concentrating it on only a few sizes and species of fish. The idea is that we would harvest every size and species, each in proportion to its natural productivity. This would be a big change from current fisheries management, which focuses on a small number of species and often protects certain size-groups from fishing (usually the small young ones, but occasionally also the very largest old ones).

Category: Nature

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