Profile: The Conversation - Art

Academic rigor, journalistic flair

The Conversation US launched as a pilot project in October 2014. It is an independent source of news and views from the academic and research community, delivered direct to the public.
Our team of professional editors work with university and research institute experts to unlock their knowledge for use by the wider public.
Access to independent, high quality, authenticated, explanatory journalism underpins a functioning democracy. Our aim is to promote better understanding of current affairs and complex issues. And hopefully allow for a better quality of public discourse and conversation.
We aim to help rebuild trust in journalism. All authors and editors sign up to our Editorial Charter. All contributors must abide by our Community Standards policy. We only allow authors to write on a subject on which they have proven expertise, which they must disclose alongside their article. Authors’ funding and potential conflicts of interest must also be disclosed. Failure to do so carries a risk of being banned from contributing to the site.

NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

See the full list of Authors here: link




NoteStreams By The Conversation - Art

8 Things You Need to Know About Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein

In his acceptance speech at the 2018 BAFTA awards, Mexican director Guillermo del Toro – a creator rather fond of monsters himself – praised the writer Mary Shelley for giving a “voice to the voiceless”. Frankenstein; or The Modern Prometheus was Shelley’s first novel, written at the tender age of 18. Here are some things you might not know about her most famous creation, first published 200 years ago in 1818.
The Conversation
CC BY-ND 4.0

Category: Book Club

View NoteStreamSave to App

Blade Runner’s Chillingly Prescient Vision of the Future

Looking back at the original theatrical release of “Blade Runner” – just as its sequel, “Blade Runner 2049” opens in theaters – I’m struck by the original’s ambivalence about technology and its chillingly prescient vision of corporate attempts to control human feelings.
Post by Marsha Gordon, Professor of Film Studies, North Carolina State University
The Conversation
CC BY-ND 4.0

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

Roger Moore: The Last Gentleman Hero

Sir Roger Moore, who died on May 23, never took himself very seriously as an actor. Nor did most critics. There was, however, far more to Roger Moore than meets the eyebrow. He was one of the most enduring film stars that Britain has ever produced.
Post by Rohan McWilliam, Professor of Modern British History, Anglia Ruskin University
The Conversation
CC BY-ND 4.0

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

The Curse of Frankenstein

Anyone remember Mary Shelley's Frankenstein? Here we explore how myths and stories shape the way people think about science,

Category: Science

View NoteStreamSave to App

5 Surprises From The Indiana Jones Films

Here are some of the more surprising things the films got right.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

The Artist’s Dilemma: What Constitutes Selling Out?

Artists need to be industrious in order to make a living from art, and may choose to work with government organizations or corporations to supplement their income. So, how does one cooperate with a large entity while ensuring moral ground?

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

In Today’s Most Popular Shows, Shakespeare’s Iconic Characters Live On

When thinking about the reasons for Shakespeare’s enduring popularity, you could point to his facility with language, his ability to deliver moments that possess both poetic complexity and heartrending simplicity. But many feel most attracted to Shakespeare’s characters, who seem to have lives that transcend the stage.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

Looking For Art In Artificial Intelligence

Algorithms help us to choose which films to watch, which music to stream and which literature to read. But what if algorithms went beyond their jobs as mediators of human culture and started to create culture themselves?

Category: Science

View NoteStreamSave to App

The Academy’s Old Boys' Club

By: Eddy Von Mueller 28150
In what’s becoming an annual occurrence, we’re in the midst of a highly publicized debate over the lack of diversity among the Oscar-nominated performers and filmmakers. Outside groups, including the NAACP, are up in arms. Several celebrities – some of them Academy members – have announced their intention to boycott the big night.
It’s not the first time that the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences has been taken to task for what seems to be ethnic or racial bias.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

So You Think You Can Dance And The Pleasure Of Screen Dance

Last month, the American reality dance competition show So You Think You Can Dance (SYTYCD) celebrated its ten-year anniversary. To mark the date, a special 60-minute episode called A Decade of Dance was aired, with re-stagings of some of the show’s most memorable dance routines by its most popular contestants.
These were interspersed with montages drawn from 11 seasons of the show: the good, the bad, the funny, and the often jaw-dropping athleticism and virtuosity of the dancers.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

The Secret To All Great Art Forgeries

In A Forger’s Tale – convicted forger Shaun Greenhalgh’s new memoir – Greenhalgh reveals that he drew Leonardo da Vinci’s La Bella Principessa, which has been valued upwards of US$100 million.
Greenhalgh even admits that he modeled the subject after a supermarket checkout girl.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

Explainer: Magical Realism

A mother lives in Ohio in the aftermath of the Civil War with the child she murdered as a slave. A poor Nigerian boy, who is also an abiku or spirit child, fights supernaturally corrupt politicians to remain in the land of the living. Welcome to magical realism: a type of storytelling in which the magical makes a surprising appearance in a realistic context. The contrast between the fantastical and real elements is used to heighten drama and challenge perceptions.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

Banksy’s Dismaland Is Pure Magic

It’s not easy being a superstar anti-establishment art celebrity. Back in the late 1990s I was one of a group of art students who, for a time, became mildly famous as art pranksters. Within the group we could never be sure – and this despite our most earnest efforts – that our work really was the stuff of revolution. But we were in the papers. We were on the Turner Prize programme. We were even offered a book deal. Nonetheless it’s hard to maintain revolutionary kudos once you’ve been interviewed by Timmy Mallett.

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App

How The Painting Got Its Name

I have a confession to make: I rarely walk into a museum or gallery without finding my eyes drifting down to the title of a painting – often before even looking at the painting itself.
Though I feel guilty about this habit, I suspect that I have a lot of company in my fellow museum goers, who probably also share my sense that there is something illicit about the practice.
But why did pictures acquire titles in the first place, and what accounts for my twinge of guilt when I turn to them?

Category: Arts

View NoteStreamSave to App