Profile: Sarah Brewer

MD

Dr Sarah Brewer MSc (Nutr Med), MA (Cantab), MB, BChir, RNutr, MBANT qualified from Cambridge University with degrees in Natural Sciences, Medicine and Surgery. After working in general practice, she gained a Master's degree in Nutritional Medicine from the University of Surrey. Sarah is a licensed Medical Doctor, a Registered Nutritionist, a Registered Nutritional Therapist and the award winning author of over 60 popular self-help books. Sarah is the editor of YourWellness magazine www.yourwellness.com.

NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

See the full list of Authors here: link




NoteStreams By Sarah Brewer

Is Red Or White Wine Better For Your Heart?

A cardiologist once told me that drinking half a bottle of red wine a day was better preventive medicine than any cholesterol-lowering medication he could prescribe. I wanted to believe him, but as a Chardonnay girl at heart I’ve always viewed the Red versus White debate with some suspicion.

Category: Wine

View NoteStreamSave to App

How Many Eggs?

Here’s an interesting study, dubbed the DIABEGG trial, in which a group of Australian researchers explored whether overweight people with type 2 diabetes would benefit from eating more eggs to boost satiety and improve weight management. The only concern was – what would happen to their cholesterol levels? Although the average hen’s egg contains around 200mg cholesterol, their total fat content isn’t high (5.2 g) and is predominantly in the form of monounsaturated fats (51%) or polyunsaturated fats (16%) rather than the saturated fats which are widely demonised (although steadily gaining admirers).

Category: Food

View NoteStreamSave to App

Diet Can Improve Multiple Sclerosis

Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common neurological disorder of young adults, with the diagnosis often made between the ages of 20 and 40 years. It’s more common in women than men (ratio of 3:2) and is also more common in temperate climates, which has raised the suggestion that lack of vitamin D may be involved. Here’s how to your diet can improve MS.

Category: Health

View NoteStreamSave to App

Olive, Rapeseed & Coconut Oils Are Best For Cooking

Which fats and oils do you use in the kitchen? You may decide to switch after reading the following. When you cook with fats and oils, heat changes their molecular structure to generate toxic chemicals called aldehydes. These are linked with an increased risk of heart disease and cancer so you obviously want to eat as few of them as possible.

Category: Food

View NoteStreamSave to App

Nutritional Medicine: Sweet Potatoes

How often do you eat sweet potatoes? By enjoying them regularly, perhaps once or twice a week, you could reduce your risk of developing breast or prostate cancer.

Category: Food

View NoteStreamSave to App

Garlic

Garlic (Allium sativum) is an important part of the Mediterranean diet, and is such a popular culinary herb that average consumption, worldwide, is equivalent to one clove per person per day.
Garlic is a source of a powerful antioxidant called allicin. Allicin is not present in whole garlic cloves, but is formed from alliin, an odourless amino acid unique to the garlic family. Cutting or crushing a garlic clove brings alliin and alliinase together to produce diallyl thiosulphinate, which provides the characteristic, pungent odour. Sulphur compounds formed from the breakdown of allicin also have beneficial, medicinal effects. Garlic can help lower cholesteral and blood pressure, and could even help ward off colds.

Category: Health

View NoteStreamSave to App