Profile: Project Continua

women, persisting

Creating and Preserving Women’s Intellectual History for the 21st Century
At this moment in history, we are the beneficiaries of 50 years of feminist empirical research which has provided us with more information than we ever imagined about many more historical women. With the help of technology, now is the time to enable widespread access to this critical mass of data.

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NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

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NoteStreams By Project Continua

Stellar Spectra: Antonia Maury

By: Lindsay Smith 29885
Antonia Maury (March 21, 1866 – January 8, 1952) was an American astronomer who published an important early catalog of stellar spectra.

Category: Biography

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Jane Loudon

Jane C. Loudon 1807-58 was a British writer best known for creating the first popular gardening manuals, providing an alternative to the specialist horticultural books of the day.

Category: Biography

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Annie Jump Cannon

If you've never heard of Annie Jump Cannon, prepare to be amazed. She was an outstanding scientist whose research helped shape contemporary astronomy. She was honored with numerous awards for her work at Harvard College Observatory, and In numerous cases, she was the first woman ever to do so.

Category: Biography

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Jeanne d’Albret

Jeanne d’Albret (1528-72) Jeanne d’Albret, later Queen Jeanne of Navarre, was born on November 16, 1528, at St Germain-en-Laye, in France. She was the daughter of Henri d’Albret, King of Navarre, and of Marguerite de Valois, Queen of Navarre, and niece to King Francis I of France. Little is known about Jeanne’s early years because female children, even those of royals and nobles, were not considered noteworthy until they became of an age to marry and bear children.

Category: Biography

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