Profile: OnEarth

Natural Resources Defense Council

onEarth tells compelling stories and offers fresh, surprising perspectives that illuminate the most critical challenges facing our world, helping set the national agenda and shape public discourse on the environment. We seek solutions and inspire readers to learn more, get involved, and take action. Our publisher, the nonprofit Natural Resources Defense Council, believes that building a better future requires a well-informed, engaged citizenry—and that traditional media is not always up to that difficult and important task. We aim to fill the gap through in-depth enterprise reporting and thought leadership, as well as aggregating and explaining the day’s most important environmental news, making it interesting and relevant to time-starved readers. We take dense and difficult subjects and render them digestible, accessible, even enjoyable to insider wonks and mainstream audiences alike.

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NoteStreams By OnEarth

He Speaks for the Trees—but First, He Listens to Them

Aside from the rustle of wind-tossed leaves or the creak of a limb, silence is the prevailing sound most of us hear from a tree. But biologist, writer, and poet David George Haskell has finer-tuned senses than most.
Biologist and writer David George Haskell discusses his new book, The Songs of Trees, and the importance of tuning in.
Interview with Clara Chaisson, a Boston-based writer and onEarth's associate editor. She previously reported for Audubon magazine and graduated from Boston University with an M.S. in science journalism.
OnEarth

Category: Nature

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Gabon’s Jungle: From Elephant Refuge To Killing Field

The dense and nearly impenetrable rainforests of Gabon have long provided protection for elephants. But new estimates tracking these noble creatures suggest that Gabon has lost around 80 percent of its forest elephants in just a decade.
OnEarth

Category: Nature

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Why African Penguins Shouldn’t Listen to Their Instincts

Thanks to overfishing and climate change, the birds are caught in an ecological trap that could lead to starvation.
On Earth

Category: Nature

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To Save These Rare Giraffes, Uganda Built an Ark (of Sorts)

As poachers and oil drills threaten a recently war-torn national park, a team of rangers and scientists send an endangered herd on an epic journey.
onEarth

Category: Nature

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Save the Binturong! Wait―What’s a Binturong?

The Philippines just set aside more than 100,000 acres for pangolins, hornbills, forest turtles, and the mysterious, mustachioed “bearcat.”
onEarth

Category: Nature

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Norway Has 68 Wolves Left—and It Wants to Kill 47 of Them

That’s the opposite of conservation (and a recipe for extinction).
onEarth

Category: Nature

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The Villain That Gave America Its First Wildlife Law

The Lacey Act has been kicking butt and taking names for more than 100 years.
onEarth

Category: Nature

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When Invasive Species Strike the Third World, People Can Starve

Exotic troublemakers have long been regarded as a “first-world problem,” but a recent study says more and more invasive species might soon creep into developing nations.
onEarth
(CC BY-4.0)

Category: Nature

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History Has Forgotten A Most Prolific Landscape Photographer

Here’s why George Alexander Grant is a name worth knowing.
onEarth
(CC BY 4.0)

Category: Nature

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Pokémon GO Gamers and Real Wildlife

Heading outside to catch ’em all? These scientists will help you identify the other creatures you might find—y’know, IRL.

Category: Nature

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Which State Towers Over Others on Wind Energy?

It’s fitting that the tallest wind turbine ever to be built on American soil would be built in Iowa—the state that blows all the others away when it comes to investing in this clean, renewable energy source.

Category: Nature

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Suburban Sprawl Is Not Pro-Family

The middle class may be getting squeezed out of our cities, but the author of a new book dangerously mistakes the symptom for the cure.

Category: Social Awareness

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War and Poverty Are Eating Away at Grauer’s Gorillas

Would you eat a gorilla? Probably not. But for people living in the Democratic Republic of Congo, eating bushmeat may be the least difficult decision they make on a daily basis.

Category: Nature

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Monarchs Need Better Pit Stops on Their Epic Journeys

Projects across the Midwest are trying to bring milkweed and nectar-filled flowers back to the landscape.

Category: Nature

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Making Frogs Chytrid-Proof: One Hopper At A Time

Can two shipping containers turn the tide against a fungal frog plague?

Category: Nature

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Poachers Abuse Loophole to Sell Rare Animals

How can you tell the difference between a captive-bred turtle and a wild-caught one? (You can’t.)

Category: Nature

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Handle With Care

This artist’s handmade porcelain reefs are almost as fragile as the real thing.

Category: Arts

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Take a Bite Out of Food Waste, One Click at a Time

Online matchmaking isn't just for lovers—it's bringing would-be wasted food and hungry people together.

Category: Food

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ZOMBIE CRABS!

Tiny, invasive East Coast parasites are leaving hordes of the living dead in their wake.

Category: Nature

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Forget Bigfoot: We’ve Got El Jefe!

One of the world’s largest cats prowls the American Southwest—and almost no one knows it’s there.

Category: Nature

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Hey, Your Fridge is Calling

Today’s technology will make tomorrow’s refrigerator the command center of the kitchen, helping you waste less food, energy, and money. Cool.

Category: Lifestyle

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A Master of His Craft

"Top Chef" judge Tom Colicchio has issued his verdict: We need safer, healthier food right now—and everyone deserves a place at the table.

Category: Food

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A Delicate Dance

Conservation efforts kept the bistate sage grouse off the Endangered Species List. Will they work for the rest of the grouses?

Category: Nature

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The Peanut Butter Solution

A (tasty) plague-fighting vaccine for prairie dogs may give endangered black-footed ferrets a new lease on life.

Category: Nature

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Should We Save The Devil's Hole Pupfish?

They’re an inch long. There are fewer than 100 left. Is it worth the effort?
“Wildlife is and should be useless,” author Richard Conniff wrote in the opinion pages of the New York Times last month, “in the same way art, music, poetry and even sports are useless.”

Category: Nature

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You Don't Know Jack(Fruit)

A single 15-foot jackfruit tree stands tucked behind some flowers in an exhibit within the Chicago Botanic Garden’s tropical greenhouse, its broad, waxy leaves covering the exhibit sign. Dangling from its gangly branches are light green male flowers the size of a swollen finger. They appear to be waiting for the plant’s lady flowers to bloom. When and if that happens, the tree will bear a large, funny-looking fruit.

Category: Food

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Invasion of the Body Smashers

Right now, an army of exoskeleton-crushing king crabs is marching out of the depths of Antarctica’s Marguerite Bay, heading closer to shore—territory they haven’t crawled over for tens of millions of years. Until the last few decades, a curtain of near-freezing water pouring off the continent has kept the creatures from entering shallower waters, where a rich array of filter-feeding brittlestars, sea lilies, feather stars, sponges, anemones, and other invertebrates thrive on the seafloor. But now that cold-water barrier is warming, allowing the crabs to return from exile. And they arrive hungry.

Category: Nature

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Crowdsourcing Could Help Save Ugly Species

Conservation funds are scarce for the colorful Manus green tree snail, though the species has suffered from its popularity in jewelry-making.

Category: Nature

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Food Fetish

On our farms, in our stores, and at our dining tables, aesthetics and efficiency are at war. Everybody loses.

Category: Food

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The Pork in the Road

Two paths are before us—but only one leads to a sustainable future of healthful, humane food production. Which one to take? (Hint: Follow the pig with the spring in its step.)

Category: Food

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12 Endangered Animals Threatened by the GOP

If the GOP-led Congress gets its way, wildlife could be in big trouble.

Category: Nature

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The Great Boto Botch Job

How a brilliant marketing move led to the slaughter of thousands of pink river dolphins.

Category: Nature

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Disaster Ecology: New Orleans

New Orleans doesn’t sound the same as it did before Hurricane Katrina hit 10 years ago. Jazz and blues may be ringing out in the French Quarter and throughout the Big Easy again, but if you were to stop and listen to the songs of birds, you might find one tune noticeably absent—that of the northern cardinal.

Category: Nature

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Sea to Table

Consumers are increasingly getting to know their local fish—and fishermen—through companies that cut out the middleman.

Category: Nature

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Scary Low Snowpack = Disaster For Wildlife

Peter Moyle was filled with trepidation as he set out in the Sierra Nevada foothills late last summer. The University of California, Davis fish biologist was on the hunt for the Red Hills roach, an endangered minnow that lives only in a single small stream near the western border of Yosemite National Park. Entire stretches of Horton Creek had been bone-dry for months, and Moyle worried that the species might have gone extinct. rnHe’s got every reason to believe conditions are likely to be worse this year.. Springs are recharged by surface water, and that’s in especially short supply, as California enters its fourth year of drought.

Category: Nature

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