Profile: Michelle Dohm

Michelle was born and raised in Chicago. After earning her degree in Chemistry from DePaul University, she headed north along Lake Michigan to Northwestern University, where she completed her PhD in the Chemistry of Life Processes. She then moved west and undertook postdoctoral work in Bioengineering at the Stanford University Schools of Engineering and Medicine. Michelle left the lab to pursue her interests in editing and digital publishing by accepting a Senior Managing Editor role at Shmoop, an educational startup. During her time there, she built and led a growing content team that wrote, edited, and produced math and science products.

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NoteStreams By Michelle Dohm

Poop Will Tell: Do Rhinos & Elephants Compete?

A recent study of the two animals in Addo Elephant National Park, called “Shift in Black Rhinoceros Diet in the Presence of Elephant: Evidence for Competition?” suggests the answer is yes. Scientists interested in helping endangered species like the African elephant and the black rhinoceros would like to know whether these animals compete for resources in the wild, as such food contests could impact the population and health of both species. Unfortunately, our favorite rough-skinned big guys have IUCN statuses of vulnerable and critically endangered, respectively, so competition for food between them may present a bit of an ecological puzzle.

Category: Nature

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Ancient Humans and Their Prehistoric Pups

While the tale of how man’s best friend came to be (i.e., domestication) is still slowly unfolding, a recently published study may provide a little context—or justification?—for dog lovers everywhere. It turns out that even thousands of years ago, humans loved to share food with, play with, and dress up their furry friends.

Category: Science

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Your Dog is Eavesdropping on You!

Researchers have been investigating the question of whether animals can eavesdrop—or listen in on third-party interactions—for some time, and evidence of potential eavesdropping has been identified in dogs and other mammals, fish, and birds.
Dogs are especially good candidates for studying eavesdropping because they are social animals and have been domesticated, so they are accustomed to interacting with humans day-in and day-out.
Researchers have also confirmed that dogs can recognize human emotions, facial expressions, and friendliness versus hostility, the latter even in strangers.
So - should you watch what you say and do around your dog?!

Category: Science

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