Profile: Marines Blog

US Marine Corps Blog

Marines Blog is the official blog of the United States Marine Corps and is maintained by Marine Corps News at the Defense Media Activity Marine Corps Element. If you are looking for the official web site for the Marine Corps please visit http://www.marines.mil.
Marines Blog strives to provide our audience with perspectives on Marine Corps news and information. We strive to facilitate an issue-driven, principle-based and audience-focused conversation online.
The appearance of external links on this site does not constitute official endorsement on behalf of the U.S. Marine Corps or Department of Defense.
You are encouraged to quote, republish or share any content on this site on your own blog, Web site or other communication/publication. If you do so, please credit the command or the person who authored the content as a courtesy.
Semper Fidelis.

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Code Talker’s Grandson Shares Navajo Roots

More than 60 years ago, a group of Native-American Marines, known as the Navajo Code Talkers, used the Navajo language to transmit secret tactical information using radios during World War II, leaving the enemy unable to decipher their messages.
That’s what Lance Cpl. Tyler Slim’s grandfather, or Cheii, Navajo for grandfather, did during his time in the Marine Corps. Hearing Cheii’s account of the Corps from an early age of five years old, made Slim want to follow in his footsteps.

Category: Military History

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Navajo Code Talkers: Uncrackable Language

Navajo Code Talker Chester Nez was born “among the oak trees” in Chichiltah, N.M. He spent his childhood herding sheep for his grandmother before leaving the close-knit community to attend a boarding high school in Tuba City, Ariz. It was there that Nez learned about a secret Marine Corps mission that would take him far away from his people and into the battlefields of World War II.
In the early months of World War II, Japanese intelligence personnel broke every code the U.S. military produced. They were able to anticipate U.S. attacks, which cost countless American lives. The U.S. forces needed a better way to communicate — and fast.

Category: Military History

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Saigon Embassy Evacuation

This is an excerpt from the ninth volume (US Marines in Vietnam: The Bitter End, 1973-1975) in a nine-volume operational and chronological historical series covering the Marine Corps' participation in the Vietnam War.
This is a story about commitment, sacrifice, and the price America and its ally, South Vietnam, paid. It answers no questions, places no blame, and offers no prophetic judgement, but provides an historical account of the end of a state and the beginning of new lives for those fortunate enough to escape that upheaval.
The authors, Major George Ross Dunham and Colonel David A. Quinlan, individually worked on this volume while assigned to the History and Museums Division, Headquarters Marine Corps.
Colonel Quinlan, who is now retired and resides in Hartford, Connecticut, began the book in 1976. Major Dunham, who recently retired and resides in Dunkirk, Maryland, inherited his co-author's work and completed the majority of the volume during his tour from 1985 to 1990. Both authors are graduates of the U.S. Naval Academy and have advanced degrees. Colonel Quinlan, who was an infantry officer, has a juris doctor degree from George Washington University (1979) and Major Dunham, who was an aviator, has a master of arts degree in history from Pepperdine University (1976).

Category: Military History

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HMM-165 The Aerial Hero Of Saigon

A CH-46E "Sea Knight" helicopter sits in a lot among many other historical aircraft; reserve squadron markings tell of its last home, but no physical markings represent its true history. Marine Medium Helicopter Squadron 165 changed that.
The Sea Knight, currently housed at the Flying Leathernecks Aviation Museum, is "Lady Ace 09," BuNo 154803) a Vietnam-era chopper that has a history as rich as the squadron itself.
In the early hours of April 30, 1975, Lady Ace 09, piloted by HMM-I65 Marine Capt. Gerry Berry, descended onto the landing pad of the embassy to extract one of the last remaining evacuees. At 4:58 a.m., the U.S. Ambassador to South Vietnam, Graham A. Martin boarded this helicopter with the U.S. flag.
Article by Cpl Aubry L. Buzek

Category: Military History

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