Profile: Lisa Taylor

Library of Congress

Lisa Taylor is a liaison specialist for the Veterans History Project of the American Folklife Center. She writes and produces promotional materials and coordinates outreach activities to encourage veterans to tell their stories and to inspire volunteer interviewers to record them. A native Washingtonian, she holds a B.A. in Journalism from Howard University and an M.A. in Organizational Communication from Bowie State University. She has worked at the Library of Congress since 2009.

NoteStream NoteStream

NoteStreams are readable online but they’re even better in the free App!

The NoteStream™ app is for learning about things that interest you: from music to history, to classic literature or cocktails. NoteStreams are truly easy to read on your smartphone—so you can learn more about the world around you and start a fresh conversation.

See the full list of Authors here: link




NoteStreams By Lisa Taylor

Female Firsts: Pioneering Women Veterans through the Years

The following is a guest blog post by Andrew Huber, a Liaison Specialist for the Veterans History Project (VHP). This is the third post in a six-part series highlighting women veterans’ collections from the VHP archive in recognition of Women’s History Month. To begin with the first post, Sharpened Pencils & Sharper Minds: World War II Women Code Breakers, please click here.
Library of Congress Blogs: Folklife Today

Category: History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Blazing Trails and Taking Names: Women in the Military

The following is the second post in a six-part series highlighting women veterans’ collections from the Veterans History Project (VHP) archive in recognition of Women’s History Month. To begin with the first post, Sharpened Pencils & Sharper Minds: World War II Women Code Breakers, please click here
Library of Congress Blogs: Folklife Today

Category: Military History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Sharpened Pencils & Sharper Minds: World War II Women Code Breakers

In 1942, reeling from Japan’s devastating surprise attack on Pearl Harbor, the United States was in desperate need of workers to serve as code breakers in the newly ramped up war effort. Most of the eligible men were either already on active duty in the armed forces, or preparing to be. Thankfully, there were hundreds of women who were good fits for this top secret program who enthusiastically answered the call to duty.
The following is the first post in a six-part series highlighting women veterans’ collections from the Veterans History Project (VHP) archive in recognition of Women’s History Month.
Library of Congress Blogs: Folklife Today

Category: Military History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Two Veterans, Two Wars, Two Remarkable Women

I recently perused the VHP online database–now comprised of more than 96,000 collections–and came across multiple records of women who played pivotal roles in every war for which the Project accepts collections. While clicking through the list, two in particular seemed to leap off of my screen and straight into my heart.
VHP is the Veterans History Project, A project of the American Folklife Center of the Library of Congress.

Category: Military History

View NoteStreamSave to App

Lend A Hand During National Volunteer Month

April is National Volunteer Month, and this week marks National Volunteer Week. I haven’t come across too many people who know this. Until about a year ago, neither did I. What is interesting to me is that those who always seem willing to roll up their sleeves and give their time, talent or treasure, without the expectation of receiving anything in exchange, do so all throughout the year. They seem to find joy and contentment in the simple act of helping others. Nonetheless, I think April is a great time to applaud their efforts and appeal to those who have yet to lend a hand.

Category: Social Awareness

View NoteStreamSave to App