Profile: Jonathan G. Way

Researcher, writer

Jon is most interested in the study of carnivores inhabiting urbanized areas. He has developed a long-term study on eastern coyotes (or coywolves as he calls them) inhabiting eastern Massachusetts, and has a B.S. (UMass Amherst), M.S. (UConn Storrs), and doctorate (Boston College) related to this research. He is the author of two books: Suburban Howls, an account of his research findings and experiences studying eastern coyotes in Massachusetts, and My Yellowstone Experience, which details - in full color - the spectacular wildlife, scenery, and hydrothermal features that can be found in the world's first national park.
He runs an organization Eastern Coyote Research that helps supports his long-term ecological and behavioral study of coywolves in Massachusetts. He also works part time with the Yellowstone Ecological Research Center examining the effects of mortality on coyote population demographics, and frequently travels to the Yellowstone area to watch wolves and bears and other wildlife. Jon is working on a third book project called 'Coywolf' which details (also a color book) the genetic and morphological findings that distinguish these animals from their parental species: western coyotes and eastern wolves. His long-term goal is to create an eastern coyote/coywolf discovery center that melds the fields of science and education to benefit both people and animals.

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NoteStreams By Jonathan G. Way

A Separate Species: the ‘Coywolf’

Recently, Roland Kays penned an interesting article in The Conversation concluding that “coywolf is not a thing,” and that it should not be considered for species status.

Category: Nature

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