Profile: Jeanette J. Epps

NASA Astronaut

A NASA Fellow during graduate school, Dr. Epps authored several highly referenced journal and conference articles describing her research. Her graduate research involved extensive testing of composite swept-tip beams, comparative analysis of analytical models and experimental data for shape memory alloys and the application of shape memory alloy actuators for tracking helicopter rotor blades. After completing graduate school, Dr. Epps spent more than 2 years working at Ford Motor Company as a Technical Specialist in the Scientific Research Laboratory. Before leaving Ford, she completed proof-of-concept work on using magnetostrictive actuators to reduce vibrations that enter a vehicle via the suspension control arms, which resulted in a provisional patent. Also while at Ford, Dr. Epps participated in research involving automobile collision location detection and countermeasure systems, which resulted in the granting of a U.S. Patent. In 2002, Dr. Epps joined the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) where she spent more than 7 years working as a Technical Intelligence Officer. She received multiple performance rewards for her work at the CIA.
NASA Experience: Dr. Epps was selected in July 2009 as 1 of 14 members of the 20th NASA astronaut class. She recently graduated from Astronaut Candidate Training that included scientific and technical briefings, intensive instruction in International Space Station systems, Extravehicular Activity (EVA), robotics, physiological training, T-38 flight training and water and wilderness survival training.

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NoteStreams By Jeanette J. Epps

A Month In The Life Of An Astronaut

November started with the graduation of the ASCAN (Astronaut Candidate) class of 2009. After two years of training, it was a nice way to close that chapter of our journey. Graduation isn't the end of training - far from it. Instead of “a day in the life of…,” I thought it might be even more useful to describe one month of my life as an astronaut in training.

Category: Science

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