Profile: Jason Steinhauer

Library of Congress

Jason Steinhauer, Program Specialist, oversees the public-facing presence of The John W. Kluge Center through the management of communications and public programs. His duties include strategic communications, website development, social media and event management, and he works closely with the Library’s Public Affairs Office and Congressional Relations Office on media relations and Congressional relations. Prior to joining the Kluge Center, Jason worked as a Liaison Specialist for the Library’s Veterans History Project. A graduate of the Library’s Leadership Development Program, Jason holds a Bachelor’s degree in American Studies from The George Washington University, and a Master’s degree in History and Advanced Certificate of Archival Management from New York University. He worked as a museum curator and archivist in New York for seven years before joining the Library in 2009.

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NoteStreams By Jason Steinhauer

Scholarly Explorations of War

For years scholars at the Kluge Center have reflected on and studied the effects of war on those who fight, the nations who engage in them, and on society as a whole, in an effort to provide meaning to these human catastrophes big and small.
Library of Congress

Category: History

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The Legacy of a Lost WWII Bomber Crew

A photograph of the ten airmen aboard the WWII bomber “Jerk’s Natural,” which disappeared over Austria on October 1, 1943. The photo led journalist Gregg Jones on a lifetime investigation to reconstruct how the men lived and how they died. Photo courtesy Gregg Jones.

Category: Military History

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The Essence of Scholarship Is Truth

The following is a guest post by Lauren Sinclair, Program Assistant at The John W. Kluge Center. It is the seventh in a series on past recipients of the Library of Congress Kluge Prize.

Category: Social Awareness

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A Librarian and Scholar Find Books & Each Other

Astrobiologist David Grinspoon and science librarian Margaret “Peg” Clifton have such an easy rapport that all I had to do was ask an initial question, and the two proceeded to speak for 30 minutes–finishing each other’s sentences along the way. The two reflect on their relationship forged at the Library of Congress that helped Grinspoon produce new scholarship on the Anthropocene Era.

Category: Science

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Historical Perspective On Cuba-U.S. Relationship

Historian Renata Keller recently spent nine months at the Kluge Center researching Cuba’s relationship with Mexico and the United States during the Cold War. She spoke with Program Specialist Jason Steinhauer about the announcement that the U.S. and Cuba will begin to normalize relations between the two countries.
Renata Keller is an Assistant Professor of International Relations at Boston University and former Kluge Fellow at the Kluge Center. More about her work can be found on our website.

Category: History

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The True Costs of 100 Years of War

Kissinger Chair Bradford Lee arrived at the Kluge Center this fall with an ambitious research question: were the results of one hundred years of American military interventions in foreign conflicts worth the costs of achieving them? He sat down with Jason Steinhauer to discuss his research, in particular his analysis of World War I, a focus of his tenure at the Library.

Category: History

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The History of Mexican Immigration to the U.S. in the Early 20th Century

As a Kluge Fellow at the Library of Congress, historian Julia Young is currently researching a new book on Mexican immigration to the U.S. during the 1920s. She sat down with Jason Steinhauer to discuss the history of this migration and the similarities and differences to immigration today.

Category: History

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