Profile: Foundation for Economic Education

FEE’s mission is to inspire, educate and connect future leaders with the economic, ethical and legal principles of a free society.
For young minds interested in an introduction to free market economics and its foundations in the broader philosophy of individual liberty, FEE is the best source for inspiring content, programs and community. FEE is not an academic or political organization; instead our focus is making the economic, ethical and legal principles of a free society widely accessible, easily understood and energizing to young minds. We do this by delivering content that is substantive and thoughtful in forms most convenient to our customers, including in-person seminars and lectures, web-delivered content, printed material in book and magazine form, and networking opportunities.
At FEE, young people—and educators who work with them—will find an exciting and optimistic introduction to the Austrian and classical liberal traditions in free market economics as well as opportunities to connect with other young people and free-market organizations around the world.

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NoteStreams By Foundation for Economic Education

Hats Off to John B. Stetson

A sickly young man from New Jersey fundamentally changed the image of the American cowboy forever, made a fortune and gave it all away.
Post by Lawrence W. Reed
Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Biography

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Atlas Shrugged: 12 Insightful Quotes From Part One

Atlas Shrugged is one of my favorite books. I’ve read it once a year since 2014 (except 2016), and new ideas and sections have stuck out each time.
Post by Ryan Ferguson
Ryan hosts the World Wanderers podcast. He has been a participant in Praxis and the Carl Menger Fellow at FEE.
Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY-SA 4.0

Category: Book Club

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Why You Should Know Some Stories By Heart

“Those were the stories that stayed with you. That meant something, even if you were too small to understand why.” – Samwise Gamgee, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers
I’m one of those people who love re-watching favorite movies and re-reading favorite stories.
Post by James Walpole
James Walpole is a writer, startup marketer, intellectual explorer, and perpetual apprentice. He writes regularly at jameswalpole.com.
Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Book Club

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The Musical Genius of Bill Evans

He left me a lifetime of amazing music that has shaped my understanding of art and music.
Post by Jeffrey A. Tucker
Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Music

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Would You Rather Be Right or Be Happy?

Have you ever argued about how to load a dishwasher? Many times a day, we all face crossroads: we choose between being right or being happy.
Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Social Awareness

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How the Market Crushed the Champagne Cartel

For hundreds of years, the bubbly white wine made in the Champagne region of France has held a monopoly. It is a monopoly on a word.
Talk about the exploitation of brand popularity. And as everyone knows, “real” Champagne is ghastly expensive, two and even three times as much as sparkling non-Champagne wine replacements. But you have to pay the price if you want the real thing, right?
That’s the premise. And it is completely wrong.
FEE: Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Social Awareness

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An Ode to Onion Rings

The diversity of onion rings illustrates the strength of a free market at satisfying the wishes of consumers, even for something as trivial as an onion ring.
Post by Tyler Groenendal
FEE: Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Social Awareness

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The Power and Glory of M&Ms

Sure they can be addictive (have you ever eaten just one?), but could the humble M&M be considered a powerful achievement?
FEE: Foundation for Economic Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Food

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Without Uber or Lyft, Austin Experiences Skyrocketing DUI Rates

When Brian had the chance to drive for Uber his goal became to take as many drunks off the road as possible.
Foundation for Econominc Education
CC BY 4.0

Category: Social Awareness

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How the Gig Economy Is Changing Work for Women

Today, more than ever before, women are fleeing the traditional workforce to join the gig economy.
Foundation for Economic Education

Category: Lifestyle

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US Muslim Population Becoming More Socially Liberal

What’s more remarkable about this fact: this transition occurred at the same time that Muslim immigration has ramped up; immigration is not detracting from those changes and may even be contributing to them.
Foundation for Economic Education
(CC BY 4.0)

Category: Social Awareness

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An Oscar for Personal Courage

Dr. Haing S. Ngor's Oscar-winning performance in The Killing Fields gave him the platform to tell the world about the mass murder that occurred between 1975 and 1979 in Cambodia at the hands of the Khmer Rouge communists.

Category: Biography

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Founding Mother and Conscience of the Revolution

Mercy Otis Warren was a political writer and propagandist of the American Revolution. This was highly unusual in the eighteenth century, as topics such as politics and war were thought to be the province of men.

Category: History

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The Hero of Hickory Farms

Richard K. Ransom, founder of Hickory Farms, died from Alzheimer’s disease on April 11, 2016. He was 96.

Category: Biography

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School Choice Works, and Here's the Evidence

There are a great many reasons to support educational choice: maximizing freedom, respecting pluralism, reducing social conflict, empowering the poor, and so on. One reason is simply this: it works.

Category: Social Awareness

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How Penn Jillette Became a Libertarian

Would You Use a Gun to Build a Library or Paint a Picture?

Category: Self Discovery

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Incandescents Now More Efficient than LEDs

Researchers at the MIT are publicizing that they have fixed the incandescent lightbulb with a brilliant improvement. They have wrapped the interior filament in a crystal glass that both bounces light and contains heat. It recycles energy in a way that addresses the main complaint against Edison’s bulb: It burns far too much energy for the light that it produces.

Category: Social Awareness

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Woman of Science: Marie Curie

She was the first woman to win a Nobel Prize — in fact, to this day she remains the only woman to win two — and the first person of either sex to win Nobel Prizes in two different sciences. These achievements make it all the more noteworthy that her undergraduate education took place at an illegal, private institution.

Category: Biography

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What Trump And Sanders Said About Oil Prices 4 Years Ago

Remember when complaining about the price of gas was all the rage? The public discourse was awash in pseudo-psychology, hand-wringing about "peak oil," and an array of conspiracy theories to explain why oil cost so much. Economists were pretty sure that the price of oil was related to supply and demand, but what did they know? One cantankerous socialist knew the truth.

Category: Social Awareness

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Brazil Is the New Greece

At 70% of GDP, public debt is worryingly large for a middle-income country and rising fast.

Category: Social Awareness

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Star Trek’s Pseudo-Economics

A fan convention dedicated to comics, graphic novels, anime, manga, video games, toys, movies, and television is not the place you’d expect to find a panel on economic theory. But economists and geeks joined forces at the recent New York Comic Con to discuss “Trekonomics,” the economics of Star Trek.

Category: Social Awareness

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Heroic Foes of Prohibitions

Barely a century ago, the hatchet-wielding “temperance” fanatic Carrie Nation smashed bars and saloons in Kansas and Texas. Some of the targets of her rage posted signs in their establishments that read, “All Nations Welcome Except Carrie.”

Category: History

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He Played Each Game as If It Were His Last

In both Puerto Rico and Pittsburgh, more than four decades after his untimely death at the age of 38, the name of Roberto Clemente brings a smile to almost every face.

Category: Sports

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He Volunteered to Go to Auschwitz

That was on a relatively good day at the infamous Auschwitz concentration camp in 1942, in the words of the only known person to have ever volunteered to be a prisoner there. His name was Witold Pilecki. His story is one of history’s most amazing accounts of boundless courage amid bottomless inhumanity.
Powerful emotions gripped me when I first learned of Pilecki and gazed at his picture. I felt rage toward the despicable regimes that put this honorable man through an unspeakable hell. I welled up with admiration for how he dealt with it all. Here you have a story that depicts both the worst and the best in men.

Category: Biography

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The Man Who Made Your Selfies Possible

Giants in the field of photography have enriched our lives far beyond the imaginations of the first few generations of Americans. While the first photographic process — called daguerreotype — was introduced commercially in 1839, decades of innovation and investment followed before picture taking was inexpensive enough to make it a national pastime. More than anyone else, the man behind that investment was George Eastman.

Category: Biography

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‘The Winner Always Has a Program’

Baseless prejudice sooner or later meets its match when it runs into raw talent and indomitable willpower. Jackie Robinson proved it in baseball, as did Joe Louis in boxing and Jesse Owens in track. In the world of tennis, the biggest winner of note was a black woman named Althea Gibson. Life’s victories don’t always go to the stronger or faster woman, to paraphrase an old adage, but Gibson demonstrated that sooner or later, the woman who wins is the one who thinks she can.

Category: Biography

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Slow Motion Financial Suicide: Roman Empire

More than 2,000 years before America’s bailouts and entitlement programs, the ancient Romans experimented with similar schemes. The Roman government rescued failing institutions, canceled personal debts, and spent huge sums on welfare programs. The result wasn’t pretty.

Category: History

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Woman Versus the State: Vivien Kellems

Born in 1896 in Des Moines, Iowa, Kellems was a locomotive that never quit. Indeed, to continue the train analogy, she was a real-life Dagny Taggart, the railroad vice president protagonist of Atlas Shrugged. Before Kellems died in 1975, she could proudly look back on a life of service to her country as a successful entrepreneur, an accomplished public speaker, a political candidate more interested in educating than in winning, and, most famously, as a tireless opponent of the IRS and its tax code. Outspoken to the end, nobody ever accused her of hiding her light under a bushel.

Category: Biography

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Yes I Can: Home Economics From My Family To Yours

I taught myself to can the year that I got divorced. My life felt a bit beyond my control, so I wanted something to do that would provide immediate results and distract me in the evenings after my kids went to bed. Though this skill had always intimidated me, some googling around and a great little book called Food in Jars persuaded me that I could probably manage to learn this skill. So I bought some fruit and some jars, and got to work.

Category: Lifestyle

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