Profile: Epicurean Epistles

Anne Green

Hi, I'm Anne and welcome to Epicurean Epistles where I share my passions for all things culinary and literary, especially fine South Australian food and wine, healthy eating, fresh produce, books, reading, and anything designed to stimulate the palate and the mind. For more about me, see About Me.

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NoteStreams By Epicurean Epistles

James Joyce's Kitchen

James Joyce’s Ulysses has been hailed as the greatest novel of the 20th century. Volumes have been written over the years about both Joyce and the book, but perhaps less widely discussed are the eating habits of both the author and the book’s protagonist, Leopold Bloom. When you take even a cursory look at Joyce and Leopold’s culinary predilections, it’s clear they both had peculiar tastes in food.
Epicurean Epistles
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Category: Book Club

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Alice Tokla's Sunday Night Suppers

Clearly, during the 39 years of Gertrude Stein and Alice Toklas' relationship, any writerly aspirations Alice may have entertained had to be sublimated in deference to the needs of the acknowledged “genius” of the family.

Category: Book Club

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Beautiful Beetroot

It may have taken a while for an appreciation of these beautiful roots to develop, but it finally happened. Not just gorgeous to look at, they're also very good for you. Julie Goodwin's wonderful recipe for Roasted Balsamic Beet Root with Onions included!

Category: Food

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The Nobility Of Fish

Epicurean Epistles is a blog about food writing past as well as present, so it’s more than time I turned my attention to some food history. It may never have occurred to you, but back in the 19th century a restaurant critic by the name of Grimod de la Reynière was so struck by the noble characteristics of fish, that in passing through the fish market, he was moved to pen some lyrical prose about them. His words are so eloquent it puts the inhabitants of our oceans in a whole new light. Even someone as indisposed towards fish as I am could almost be moved to a new level of piscatorial admiration.

Category: Food

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