Profile: David S. Pedulla

Ass’t Prof., Dept of Sociology

David Pedulla is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Sociology and a Faculty Research Associate of the Population Research Center at the University of Texas at Austin. His research interests include race and gender stratification, labor markets, economic and organizational sociology, and experimental methods. Specifically, his research agenda examines the consequences of the rise of non-standard, contingent, and precarious employment in the United States as well as the processes leading to race and gender labor market stratification. David’s research has appeared in American Sociological Review, American Journal of Sociology, Social Forces, and other academic journals. His work has been supported by the National Science Foundation, the Russell Sage Foundation, the Horowitz Foundation for Social Policy, and the UC-Davis Center for Poverty Research. He received his Ph.D. in Sociology and Social Policy from Princeton University.

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Here’s How Minority Job Seekers Battle Bias in the Hiring Process

Discrimination in the hiring process has limited the opportunities available to both racial minorities – such as African Americans – and women, with important consequences for their well-being and careers. For example, research has shown that white job applicants receive 50% more callbacks for interviews than equally qualified African American applicants. And, in the low-wage labor market, scholars have found that African American men without criminal records receive similar callback rates for interviews as white men just released from prison. Researchers have also documented discrimination in hiring against women, with particularly strong penalties against mothers.

Category: Business

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