Profile: Alisa Opar

Science & Environment Journalist

Alisa Opar is Earthwire's Western correspondent. She is also the articles editor at Audubon magazine, and has written for many publications about science and the environment.

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NoteStreams By Alisa Opar

ZOMBIE CRABS!

Tiny, invasive East Coast parasites are leaving hordes of the living dead in their wake.

Category: Nature

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A Delicate Dance

Conservation efforts kept the bistate sage grouse off the Endangered Species List. Will they work for the rest of the grouses?

Category: Nature

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Disaster Ecology: New Orleans

New Orleans doesn’t sound the same as it did before Hurricane Katrina hit 10 years ago. Jazz and blues may be ringing out in the French Quarter and throughout the Big Easy again, but if you were to stop and listen to the songs of birds, you might find one tune noticeably absent—that of the northern cardinal.

Category: Nature

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Sea to Table

Consumers are increasingly getting to know their local fish—and fishermen—through companies that cut out the middleman.

Category: Nature

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Scary Low Snowpack = Disaster For Wildlife

Peter Moyle was filled with trepidation as he set out in the Sierra Nevada foothills late last summer. The University of California, Davis fish biologist was on the hunt for the Red Hills roach, an endangered minnow that lives only in a single small stream near the western border of Yosemite National Park. Entire stretches of Horton Creek had been bone-dry for months, and Moyle worried that the species might have gone extinct. rnHe’s got every reason to believe conditions are likely to be worse this year.. Springs are recharged by surface water, and that’s in especially short supply, as California enters its fourth year of drought.

Category: Nature

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