Profile: American Childhood Cancer Organization

..because kids can’t fight cancer alone!

American Childhood Cancer Organization: Advances in medical science over the past 100 years have led to a dramatic decrease in child mortality in the United States: clean drinking water and improved sanitation, the introduction of antibiotics, and vaccines for most common childhood diseases has made the death of a child in the United States a rarity—something you may hear about on the news, but not something that could happen to you or someone you love. Yet amidst all the amazing miracles of science that have made the death of a child so exceptional, there is one glaring omission: cancer. Childhood cancer remains the number one disease killer of children in the United States today, and the leading cause of death for children between the ages of 4 and 14 after unintended fatal accidents. Yet despite this sobering fact, childhood cancer remains a silent disease: hidden in the shadows of modern hospitals, left behind by modern miracle cures.
The American Childhood Cancer Organization is dedicated to fighting this last great disease killer of children. We are engaged in this ongoing struggle because we understand the emotional and physical toll childhood cancer takes on its victims and their families, because we ourselves have been touched by it. The ACCO (formerly known as Candlelighters) was founded by a talented and committed group of parents whose children were diagnosed with cancer at a time when surviving childhood cancer was nearly impossible. Since that day, we have grown from a small group of committed parents to one of the nation’s largest, grassroots organizations dedicated to making the lives of children and families suffering from this disease and its long-term side effects easier, even as we work towards giving these children the benefit of one more miracle cure.

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NoteStreams By American Childhood Cancer Organization

Types of Cancer in Children

Childhood cancers are very, very different than adult cancers, and require very different, specialized treatments.

Category: ACCO

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Twibbon Campaign for Childhood Cancer Awareness Month

September is Childhood Cancer Awareness Month, and we need your help! We invite you to Go Gold for Kids With Cancer and turn your profile picture GOLD to stand with the many children across the United States battling cancer or living with the long-term effects of this terrible disease and today’s toxic, outdated treatments.

Category: ACCO

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Dealing with Diagnosis

In the briefest space of time, in the time it takes to say just four little words, the normal, hectic, everyday life of a family can so easily be turned upside down. Hearing those four words that every parent dreads–“Your child has cancer”–is a life-altering experience, and indeed not just for parents, but for siblings, relatives, and even friends.

Category: ACCO

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Children & Cancer: Financial & Insurance Issues

When your child has just been diagnosed with cancer, your top priority is ensuring that your child gets immediate access to the treatment protocols he or she needs to fight back against this terrible disease. The very last thing you want to worry about is money: whether you can afford the very best care and what it will mean for the financial future of your family. However, taking the time to consider the financial implications of childhood cancer and developing a strategy to approach them will go a long way to ensuring a happy, healthy future for everyone in your family.

Category: Childrens Cancer Awareness

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Childhood Cancer Healthcare System

For a young child, just a routine check-up or basic blood test can be absolutely terrifying. But when a child is suddenly diagnosed with cancer and facing extended hospital stays and complicated medical procedures, both the young patient and his parents have to quickly adjust to the complex, scary, and strange world of oncology and advanced medicines. The ACCO is dedicated to helping families facing a cancer diagnosis navigate this new and different world as comfortably and completely as possible, so families can focus their time and energy on comforting their child and making the best possible decisions for his or her long-term health and happiness.

Category: ACCO

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Children Diagnosed with Cancer: Back to School

For most children, going to school forms the backbone of their daily routine: normal, everyday activities like catching the bus, greeting their friends, completing in-school activities, and doing nightly homework are so regular that most of us don’t even think about them. For a family coping with a diagnosis of cancer, handling the daily routine of school can seem like just one more insurmountable challenge. Yet for school-age children, and especially middle-and high-school children, taking the time to think through how to approach school-related issues both during–and after–treatment will play a critical role in ensuring your child’s academic success once treatment is complete.

Category: ACCO

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A Parent's Guide To Clinical Trials: Part 1

Many of the advances in treatment for childhood cancer can be attributed to the success of clinical trial research. Clinical trials are controlled research studies that test new drugs or devices or a new combination of existing drugs in order to improve available therapies.
This NoteStream is focused on clinical trial design. Parents who are familiar with study design terminology and who have a basic understanding of the purpose of clinical trials are better equipped to make informed treatment decisions. Every child is unique, and treatment decisions are also unique to individual children and their families.

Category: ACCO

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